Trip the light haphazard

It struck me recently when I was taking care of my youngest grandson (Jessie) that walking is so wonderful that I had to relook at it from a different perspective. Jessie is only 17 months young and we take him to swimming lessons every Saturday morning. One of the games is to get the little ones to walk on a thin foam floating mattress and dive off the end into a waiting parent or in my case grandfather. It’s funny to watch but it also accentuates how wonderful it is to see him master the art of walking on an unstable surface.

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I suppose you are thinking “What has this got to do with Oak tree?”

Walking let alone running, dancing, sport or all the other things we do on our pins is nothing short of a miracle. Just ask someone who has lost the use of their legs. The combination of balance, muscles, bones, timing, blood flow, brain co-ordination etc. is such a complex endeavour that most animals don’t even try it. Walking up or down  a set of stairs relies not only on all the normal walking tasks but also an inbuilt memory for the previous step which creates a kind of rhythmic dance that lets one progress with a fluid motion. If one step is only slightly different in dimension compared to the others there is every likelihood that stair users might trip on that same tread over and over.

Bearing this in mind we at Oak Tree take it very seriously to make sure we get the best result where small trip potentials might exist. During our design process which is in a constant state of revision and innovation we take great care to minimise slopes and eliminate trip hazards and steps. It has proven to be a challenging enterprise but we have been very successful and mindful of the difficulties associated with steps and the like.

So when next you see someone taking a leisurely stroll just imagine all the complex co-ordination of movements required just to advance.

 

Ciao and happy walking

Leonardo